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SPRINTER VAN FOREHEAD

NEOMSAN ADVENTURE MODS SPRINTER AND OTHER VAN’S FOREHEAD

Neomsan Adventure Mods is an off-road aftermarket stainless steel and aluminium bars company based in Istanbul. Starting in 2020 in Beylikdüzü the company eventually merged with Chandler Equipment in 2017. The Neomsan company can now be found in a production facility in Giyimkent İstanbul . Despite their rapid success and growth the team holds fast to its roots. We had the opportunity to work with Evan and the Neomsan team on their newest project, the Neomsan Sprinter Van forehead

             

FROM CAD TO VAN

It was great to share their creative process. We watched the Sprinter Van forehead design grow from a sketch on paper to 3D CAD renderings and finally to the first ever forehead and Ladder prototype. We were super excited to be able to test the new products out on our build and give feedback to the team.

We love the robust look of the Sprinter Van forehead by ligths front. It compliments our Neomsan Nomad Bumper and gives our rig a rugged aggressive look. The front of the Rack helps to cover the large forehead design of the Sprinter van and holds two Pathfinder light bars, perfect for nighttime off-roading.

                     

TESTED IN THE WILD

Now it was time to test the new van forehead products off road and on highway. They performed wonderfully. We don’t hear any wind noise and they have stated solid on board after many off-road trails. The angles on the front corners of the forehead  perform well when brushing past low hanging branches allowing them to brush over the rig.

 

We are very happy with our Neomsan Sprinter Van forehead  we hope to see more of them on the road soon! Once you join the Neomsan mail link

GET YOUR OWN SPRINTER

Description

High quality hand polished Stainless Steel Front Spot Light Roof Bar to suit Mercedes Sprinter (2014 – 2018 model). This top of the range bar will have your vehicle looking top spec at a fraction of the cost of the genuine items but with the same high quality.

Please Note: This bar is suitable for medium and high roof Sprinter only. This sale is for Roof Bar and clamps only. Spot Lamps are not included. Please see other listings for Bar with Spot Lamps.

Made from high quality SUS 304 grade stainless steel material, these top of the range bars give a full mirror stainless look to your vehicle. Our bars present a quality product for your vehicle at a reasonable price which also includes anti-break, anti-fade lifetime warranty. Please be aware of other bars that use a cheaper lower grade of material that will fade and lose its shine after a few months of use, our products won’t.

  • Highest quality SUS 304 grade stainless steel.
  • Easy fitting.
  • Instructions and fitting kit included.
  • Fits 2014 – 2018 medium and high roof models.
  • Lifetime warranty.
  • Includes 4 stainless steel spot lamp clamps as standard.
  • Fits to both Flat and High Roof models.
  • For technical support please contact us via eBay messages.

LED marker lights can also be added. Please contact for a quote.

Bars are foam wrapped, new and come complete with all the nuts bolts and fixings necessary for fitting.

Trade enquiries welcome

PRODUCTS DESCRIPTIONS VEHICLE CLASS PIPE SIZE
MASTER 3 2010+  FOREHEAD WITH 4 FOG BRACKETS  Ø60 RENAULT MASTER 3 Ø60
SPRINTER 3 2014+ FOREHEAD WITH 4 FOG BRACKETS  Ø60 MERCEDES SPRINTER 3 Ø60
SPRINTER II 2007-2013 FOREHEAD WITH 4 FOG BRACKETS  Ø60 MERCEDES SPRINTER II Ø60
JUMPR II   2007-2014 FOREHEAD WITH 4 FOG BRACKETS  Ø60 CITROEN JUMPER II Ø60
JUMPR III 2015+ FOREHEAD WITH 4 FOG BRACKETS  Ø60 CITROEN JUMPER III Ø60
DCATO II 2007-2015 FOREHEAD WITH 4 FOG BRACKETS  Ø60 FIAT DUCATO II Ø60
DCATO III 2016+ FOREHEAD WITH 4 FOG BRACKETS  Ø60 FIAT DUCATO III Ø60
SPRINTER I 2000-2006 FOREHEAD WITH 4 FOG BRACKETS  Ø60 MERCEDES SPRINTER I Ø60
BOXER 2 2006-2015 FOREHEAD WITH 4 FOG BRACKETS  Ø60 PEUGEOT BOXER 2 Ø60
BOXER 3 2015+ FOREHEAD WITH 4 FOG BRACKETS  Ø60 PEUGEOT BOXER 3 Ø60
CRAFTER 2008+FOREHEAD WITH 4 FOG BRACKETS  Ø60 VOLKSWAGEN CRAFTER Ø60

 

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Thanks to a batch of modifications done by NEOMSAN 4×4, the DACIA Duster has been totally transformed into a well-rounded off-roader along every road.

Known as one of the characters in the worldwide success story of the France-based automaker, the Dacia Duster has been a front-runner in the UV segment for quite some time now. In Europe, though it has to directly rival the likes of Hyundai Creta, which are currently one of the most sought-after vehicles, the Duster still manages to attract for a set of loyal buyers all around. Over and above, the Duster is also associated with a dashing good look, versatile cabin, powerful engines and decent off-roading capabilities package. Therefore, the French branded SUV becomes one of the most beloved models for virtually all tuners in the car modification world.

Dacia (Renault) Duster with Offroad-modifications by Neomsan 4×4

A tuning studio based out of Turkey named Neomsan 4×4 feels that the Duster is truly a stellar SUV with standard boxes but it even does better after being spiced up some. That’s why the Turkish tuning firm worked on an exclusive customization kit for the Duster that helps it break the limit to step into the territory of a mind-blowing badass off-roader SUV. To tell the truth, this aftermarket customization kit really fits the Duster so well regarding both aesthetics and performance aspects. The ride height of the Duster now has been lifted by a huge margin thanks to the infusion of a 30 mm lift kit while the 5 mm thick black aluminium underbody protectors do safeguard the engine-transmission from being damaged in challenging conditions as well as increase the car’s off-road competencies to a greater extent. Furthermore, the indeed black colour theme gives the car a sense of boldness and ruggedness that make it an absolute stunner for any onlookers.

You may notice that the highlighting aftermarket feature made to the Duster is a bigger black wheels setup. The customized SUV adopts a set of 215/70R16 BF Goodrich All-Terrain tyres that further enhances the off-roading masculinity of the badass beast. On the other hand, this set of wheel tyres also helps increase the ground clearance and traction of the model compared to a higher stance when compared to the standard units while a two-ton winch kit also intensely aid the SUV in case it gets stuck on any rough terrain.

Over the top, the excellent custom Duster sees the inclusion of a big roof rack that is totally convenient for carrying goodies on the go, especially for the long adventure trips. It also comes up with a set of PIAA front lamps and LED light bar that enables better visibility alongside the roads, especially during the night time running. Stunningly, the special version of Duster also packs a bull bar made of polished stainless steel that makes it, all the way, meet the mandatory pedestrian safety regulations.

The tuning firm Neomsan 4×4 also brings on a range of custom rims for customers to freely choose from, meeting the insatiable customers’ tastes. The most expensive kit is the BF Goodrich rubber which is priced well at €1,300 while the others sit at around €1,050

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Can anyone catch the big Merc when it comes to heavy duty usage? Trevor Gehlcken reports

I’ve been a journalist for nigh on 50 years now and during that time I have always stuck by the principle that I NEVER take sides when writing articles.
Whatever the subject I’m writing about – whether it’s the war in Syria or the price of cheese – I sit firmly on the fence and present all the facts as they come, for my readers to draw their own conclusions.

That’s what I was taught to do all those years ago at journalism college.
Therefore, I have a confession to make before starting this particular road test on the latest Mercedes-Benz Sprinter – I own a 57-plate Sprinter van conversion and I love it almost as much as my partner Linda. It’s part of the family what with holidays, festivals and weekends away and has never failed to impress, either by its reliability or its ability blat down the motorway at 70mph all day long, fully-loaded and in the utmost quiet and comfort.

In-depth knowledge

So although I am far from unbiased and am unlikely to say anything bad about the Sprinter, my in-depth knowledge of the older model does at least give me an advantage over my journalistic rivals in that I am in a commanding position to compare the two.
The Sprinter – in long wheelbase, high roof format (just like that of my camper van) – arrived at my home in Essex on my birthday and I was kind of hoping in my dreams that the guys and gals at Mercedes-Benz HQ in Milton Keynes might let me keep it under the circs. But sadly, all too soon, my test week went by and the van was collected again.
OK so let’s get down to brass tacks. Bias on my part or not, it’s true to say the Sprinter has been a legend in the world of vans since its first appearance in 1995. The three-pointed star promises top quality and that’s exactly what you get – although of course, as you would expect, it ain’t exactly cheap against the opposition.
But whatever the rivals do to take the big Merc’s crown away – models such as the new Volkswagen Crafter for example – the traders I talk to all want the Merc first – exactly as I did when I bought my camper van in fact. I looked at Fiat Ducatos and Ford Transits for sure, but in the end my money went firmly on that big Teutonic star.

Similar packaging

The first thing to not about the latest Sprinter is that it doesn’t look hugely different from the old one – which is a great thing for people who own the old model as it won’t suddenly look dated. The Sprinter still looks as fresh as it did when first launched back in 2006, so why fix it when it ain’t broke, as they say. No changes have been made to the engines either, other than the installation of a keyless push-button starting system.
Sprinter retains the big-hearted 190hp 3.0-litre diesel familiar from the old model and the 2.1-litre diesels at 114hp, 143hp or 163hp have been carried across too.
A key development, however, is the arrival of front-wheel-drive. Previous Sprinters were rear-wheel-drive or four-wheel-drive only and both configurations are still available, although the most powerful of the 2.1-litre diesels is not offered in front-wheel-drive variants.
Going the front-wheel-drive route gives you a loading height that is 80mm below that of rear-wheel-drive derivatives. Payload capacity is up by 50kg and vans – Sprinter is also sold as a chassis-cab – get 0.5cu m more cargo space.
Front-wheel-drive Sprinters gross at 3.0 to 4.1 tonnes, while their rear-wheel-drive stablemates gross at 3.0 to 5.5 tonnes. Maximum van load cube is 17cu m while maximum payload capacity is 3,150kg if you opt for the 5.5-tonner.

Safety devices include a reversing camera which shows what it sees on the rear-view mirror in the cab and a parking package which provides drivers with a bird’s-eye view of what’s happening all around the vehicle. Fitted too is Active Brake Assist, which brakes you if it looks as though you are going to collide with something.
Also listed is DISTRONIC, radar-based technology which ensures you keep a healthy distance from other vehicles ahead of you on the motorway once you’ve set your desired speed. Get too close and your speed will be reduced, and if necessary you will be braked to a standstill. Blind Spot Assist can be installed. It recognises traffic and pedestrians crossing behind Sprinter and can brake autonomously in an emergency.
Our test model came weighed down with a host of added goodies which would dazzle the average van buyer, including metallic paint, auto gearbox, air-con, active lane-keeping assist, foglamps and special driver’s seat among many others. They are all great bits of kit to be sure, but together they add a whopping £6,880 to the price. Suffice to say great care must be taken at buying time to decide exactly which goodies you really need and which you can do without.

All aboard

It’s not until you climb aboard that the real changes start becoming obvious. The dash, for example, is all new.
There’s a boxy kind of affair in the middle of the dash that holds all the techy stuff and other switches and knobs. To be honest I prefer my old dash layout, but it’s purely a matter of opinion.

The driver’s seat is to die for, oh so comfortable, but it does come as a special at £105 extra.
What I really had trouble with first was the fact that there’s no gear lever and no handbrake lever either. The handbrake is coaxed on and off with a little switch on the right hand side of the dash, while gears are selected automatically by a stalk under the steering wheel.

The engine fires up with a push button on the dash too – all rather curious to old groaners like me til you get used to it. Meanwhile the screen in the centre console controls all the functions and seems to do everything but the weekly wash as far as I could see.

The old cigar lighter has been consigned to the great ashtray in the sky and there were no USP ports either to plug my personal satnav into, although Mercedes had added a wire coming out under the dashboard for this purpose. It shows how fast technology is moving at present – just when I thought I was bang up to date, I’m an old dinosaur again – hey ho! Another rather curious addition in my book are the six coffee cup/drink holders.

With seating for just three, is there something I don’t know about modern liquid consumption amongst van drivers?!
In the back there’s a cavernous amount of space on offer and I would have to warn potential owners of the risk of overloading, This van must not weigh more than three and a half tonnes fully loaded – and that weight can be over-reached easily.
Our test van was fully ply-lined at a cost of £335 (essential for any heavy duty users) plus there was a useful racking system fitted to keep loads in place, although this turned out to be a £225 option.

On the road

Once the engine fires up, my old Sprinter really shows its age. Although it suits me fine, its performance pales into insignificance against this newcomer, which bounds along smoothly and quietly almost as if by magic.

The seven gears change seamlessly and despite its size, the Sprinter glides round the bends as if they aren’t there. I managed a 400-mile trip in one day during our test period and alighted at the end of it as if I’d just nipped round to the corner shop.

TECH SPEC

Model: Sprinter 316 L3H2 RWD

Power (bhp/rpm): 163/3,800

Torque (Nm/rpm): 360/1,400-2,400

Fuel economy (combined mpg): 36.2

CO2 emissions (g/km): 211

Price: £34,060

ACCESSORIES

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Ford has reintroduced the Thunder badge to its UK line-up.

First seen more than a decade and a half ago, the high-spec model had always been at the look-at-me end of the range – and that’s the case more than ever now, with a 1400-strong limited-edition double-cab model whose two-tone interior and high-spec leather-clad cabin are very much designed to attract attention.

Powered by Ford’s 2.0-litre twin-turbo EcoBlue diesel engine, whose 213bhp and 369lbf.ft are put out through a 10-speed automatic gearbox, the Ranger Thunder is based on the Wildtrak model and costs from £32,965 plus VAT. Its styling package includes a Sea Grey paint scheme with red highlights, as well as 18” alloy wheels whose black finish matches those of the front grille, rear bumper, skid plates, light bezels and door handles.

Inside, the cabin features black leather seats with red stitching – which is also extended across the steering wheel and dashboard. You even get bespoke red-illuminated sill plates.

The Thunder model aims to help the Ranger build on last year’s best-ever European sales figures of 52,500 – which included more than 16,000 in the UK alone. This level of popularity is even more remarkable considering the Ranger is the oldest pick-up on the market – two major revisions notwithstanding, the current model has been in production since 2011.